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Packing Smart and Traveling Light

By Rick Steves The importance of packing light cannot be overemphasized, but, for your own good, I'll try. You'll never meet a traveler who, after five trips, brags: "Every year I pack heavier." The measure of a good traveler is how light he or she travels. You can't travel heavy, happy, and cheap. Pick two. [caption id="attachment_1124" align="aligncenter" width="225"] Too much luggage marks you as a typical tourist. It slams the Back Door shut.[/caption] One Bag, That's It My self-imposed limit is 20 pounds in a 9" × 22" × 14" carry-on-size bag (it'll fit in your airplane's overhead bin). At my company, we've taken tens of thousands of people of all ages and styles on tours through Europe. We allow only one carry-on bag. For many, this is a radical concept: 9" × 22" × 14"? That's my cosmetics kit! But they manage, and they're glad they did. After you enjoy that sweet mobility and freedom, you'll never go any other way. You'll walk with your luggage more than you think you will. Before flying to Europe, give yourself a test. Pack up completely, go into your hometown, and practice being a tourist for an hour. Fully loaded, you should enjoy window-shopping. If you can't, stagger home and thin things out. When you carry your own luggage, it's less likely to get lost, broken, or stolen. Quick, last-minute changes in flight plans become simpler. A small bag sits on your lap or under your seat on the bus, taxi, and airplane. You don't have to worry about it, and, when you arrive, you can hit the ground running. It's a good feeling. When I land in London, I'm on my way downtown while everyone else stares anxiously at the luggage carousel. When I fly home, I'm the first guy…

Resumption of Trips after typhoon Seniang

To our valued customers: All Visayas trips are now resumed. Happy New Year!  

10 Tips to Prevent Motion Sickness

Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stoppler, MD Medical Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD Motion sickness, sometimes referred to as sea sickness or car sickness, is a very common disturbance of the inner ear that is caused by repeated motion. In addition to sea travel, motion sickness can develop from the movement of a car or from turbulence in an airplane. The symptoms of motion sickness are nausea, vomiting, dizziness, sweating, and a sense of feeling unwell. These symptoms arise from the inner ear (labyrinth) due to changes in one's sense of balance and equilibrium.   [caption id="attachment_224" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Motion Sickness[/caption] While it may be impossible to prevent all cases of motion sickness, the following tips can help you prevent or lessen the severity of motion sickness: Watch your consumption of foods, drinks, and alcohol before and during travel. Avoid excessive alcohol and foods or liquids that "do not agree with you" or make you feel unusually full. Heavy, spicy, or fat-rich foods may worsen motion sickness in some people. Avoiding strong food odors may also help prevent nausea. Try to choose a seat where you will experience the least motion. The middle of an airplane over the wing is the calmest area of an airplane. On a ship, those in lower level cabins near the center of a ship generally experience less motion than passengers in higher or outer cabins. Do not sit facing backwards from your direction of travel. Sit in the front seat of a car. Do not read while traveling if you are prone to motion sickness. When traveling by car or boat, it can sometimes help to keep your gaze fixed on the horizon or on a fixed point. Open a vent or source of fresh air if possible. Isolate yourself from others who may be…